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Moses Myers House

323 E. Freemason St.
Open Saturday and Sunday

Noon–5 p.m.

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Reading Room
Currently closed

About the Myers House

The oldest Jewish home in America open to the public as a museum offers a glimpse of the life of an early 19th century merchant family.
More about the house

About the Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Art Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

Located in Norfolk

One Memorial Place,
Norfolk, VA
Get Directions

While You're Here

Visit our Museum Shop
and the Wisteria Cafe.

Perry Glass Studio

A state-of-art facility on the Museum’s campus. See a free glassmaking demo Tuesdays–Sunday at noon. Like what you see? Take a class with us! More about the Studio

Moses Myers House

The home of the first permanent Jewish residents of Norfolk, this historic house offers a glimpse of the life of a wealthy early 19th-century merchant family.
More about the house

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the Library

Wedding & Event Rentals

The perfect place for your big day or special event. Get the details

In-person Tours

Group tours are available for groups of 20 or fewer. More about tours

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Visit one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

About the Chrysler

Our story spans well over 100 years. See where we began, how we grew, and where we're going. Explore our history

News and Announcements

See what's happening at the Museum, read Chrysler Magazine, and find our Media Center. Read now

Location

745 Duke Street
Norfolk, VA 23510
757-333-6299

Always Free Parking

Get Directions

Third Thursdays

Live art performances monthly.
See the archive

Studio Team

Meet the brilliant minds behind the Studio.
See the team

Visiting Artist Series

Bringing the world’s top glass art talent to Hampton Roads
Find out more

Give the Chrysler Experience

Share everything you love about the Chrysler Museum with a gift membership. Perfect for everyone on your list.

The Masterpiece Society

Learn about this innovative group of museum supporters.
Meet the Masterpiece Society

Planned Giving

Help ensure the long-term success of the Museum.
Learn about planned giving

Moses Myers House

323 E. Freemason St.
Open Saturday and Sunday

Noon–5 p.m.

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Reading Room
Currently closed

About the Myers House

The oldest Jewish home in America open to the public as a museum offers a glimpse of the life of an early 19th century merchant family.
More about the house

About the Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Art Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

Located in Norfolk

One Memorial Place,
Norfolk, VA
Get Directions

While You're Here

Visit our Museum Shop
and the Wisteria Cafe.

Perry Glass Studio

A state-of-art facility on the Museum’s campus. See a free glassmaking demo Tuesdays–Sunday at noon. Like what you see? Take a class with us! More about the Studio

Moses Myers House

The home of the first permanent Jewish residents of Norfolk, this historic house offers a glimpse of the life of a wealthy early 19th-century merchant family.
More about the house

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the Library

Wedding & Event Rentals

The perfect place for your big day or special event. Get the details

In-person Tours

Group tours are available for groups of 20 or fewer. More about tours

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Visit one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

About the Chrysler

Our story spans well over 100 years. See where we began, how we grew, and where we're going. Explore our history

News and Announcements

See what's happening at the Museum, read Chrysler Magazine, and find our Media Center. Read now

Location

745 Duke Street
Norfolk, VA 23510
757-333-6299

Always Free Parking

Get Directions

Third Thursdays

Live art performances monthly.
See the archive

Studio Team

Meet the brilliant minds behind the Studio.
See the team

Visiting Artist Series

Bringing the world’s top glass art talent to Hampton Roads
Find out more

Give the Chrysler Experience

Share everything you love about the Chrysler Museum with a gift membership. Perfect for everyone on your list.

The Masterpiece Society

Learn about this innovative group of museum supporters.
Meet the Masterpiece Society

Planned Giving

Help ensure the long-term success of the Museum.
Learn about planned giving

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Edvard Munch and the Cycle of Life

Mental Health Resources and Expert Response

Each year millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental illness. The Museum’s spring exhibition, Edvard Munch and the Cycle of Life captures how pain and healing were a part of life for Munch, who suffered an unusual amount of early trauma and vulnerability.

Resources

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline,Hours: Available 24 hours. Languages: English, Spanish.
1-800-273-8255

NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Coastal Virginia has free support groups and classes for both the person with a mental health condition and their families and are now offering online support groups.  www.namicoastalvirginia.org or call 757-499-2041 for support group days/times and class schedules.

I Need a Light House, a Depression and Suicide Education Awareness Program: www.ineedalighthouse.org or 757-567-5429

The Mentally Healthy Coalition is a group of health professionals, educators, city officials, nonprofit leaders, and others. Please visit talkaboutitnorfolk.com to learn more.

Response

On May 6, National Alliance on Mental Health Illness Coastal Virginia, The Chrysler Museum of Art and Hampton Roads Pride partnered to host Edvard Munch: Viewing Art through the Lens of Mental Health, a dialogue and discussion on art therapy led by Chrysler Museum Director Erik Neil. Panelists included Lloyd DeWitt, Irene Leache Curator of European Art and Chief Curator at the Chrysler Museum; Courtney Boone, Board President, National Alliance on Mental Health Illness Coastal Virginia; Cole Werkheiser, President, Hampton Roads Pride; Whitley Rogers, registered art therapist and licensed professional counselor; Todd Rosenlieb, Founder and Artistic Director for Todd Rosenlieb Dance and Chair of the Governor’s School for the Arts Dance Department; Jennifer Novotny, NAMI volunteer.

Below the video, read responses to the works of Edvard Munch from our community of mental health professionals.

Edward Munch, The Scream
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863–1944)
Geschrei (The Scream), 1895
Lithograph
National Gallery of Art, Washington
Rosenwald Collection, 1943
Jen Williams, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Coastal Virginia

Reflections on The Scream by Edvard Munch

So many of the images in the Munch exhibition reflect the feelings that people living with a mental health condition may experience.  The Scream portrays the panic of being frightened and full of anxiety, and many people with mental illness will recognize the feelings of isolation, loneliness and despair in the face of the woman in the Peer Gynt lithograph.  As Munch shows us, art can be an expression of one’s feelings, but can also provide a welcome release from the everyday challenge of viewing life through the lens of a mental illness.

With one in five people experiencing a mental health condition in their lifetime, it is important for family and friends to recognize and talk openly with their loved ones if they see them self-isolating, or displaying unusual sadness, despair, anxiety, anger, appetite and sleep changes, manic feelings or talk of being tired of living.  Express your concern, and urge them to seek help. NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Coastal Virginia has free support groups and classes for both the person with a mental health condition and their families.  We are now offering online support groups.  Visit our website at www.namicoastalvirginia.org, or call our office at 757-499-2041 for support group days/times and class schedules.

Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863–1944)
Crowds in a Square, 1920
Color woodcut
National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Epstein Family Collection, 2013
Kay Ashby, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Coastal Virginia

Reflections on Crowds in a Square by Edvard Munch

It’s as if Munch drew this today envisioning our towns and cities attacked by Covid19 which appears as a red cloud overhead. The sense of death and gruesome reaction to a terrible vision strikes me most.

But I also see Crowds in a Square created to show the horrors of someone suffering from paranoia who sees not a placid city square but rather a square filled with death and the community turned against him.

Kathleen Wakefield, MS Ed, Founder & Executive Director, I Need A Lighthouse, Inc.

Reflections on The Scream by Edvard Munch

I realize this is Munch’s most known piece. For myself and probably many others, it shows how close to the edge we are at some time or many times in our lives.

The refreshing and energizing aspect is even though we all at some time feel that way, either with good therapy or resources within us, we can and do move forward with life.

kwakefield@ineedalighthouse.org
757-567-5429
www.ineedalighthouse.org

 

 

 

 

Edward Munch, The Scream
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863–1944)
Geschrei (The Scream), 1895
Lithograph
National Gallery of Art, Washington
Rosenwald Collection, 1943
Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863–1944)
Café Bauer, Berlin, 1902
Drypoint
National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection, 1944
Elena Schexnider, NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Coastal Virginia

Reflections on Cafe Bauer, Berlin by Edvard Munch

Sometimes one can sit in a café where not a single chair is unoccupied and still feel alone.  We must not forget, however, that while feeling lonely is a natural aspect of the human experience, we still need one another.  We are ALL trying to navigate the roadmap of life.  We must help each other along the way.

Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863–1944)
Alpha's Despair from Alpha and Omega, 1908–09
Lithograph in black
National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Epstein Family Collection, 2002

Reflections on Alpha’s Despair by Edvard Munch

We can only speculate the reason Alpha’s gaze is so melancholic.  However, each of us can relate to the sentiment of fear or perhaps loss that characterizes different events of our lives.  Just as the waves in the body of water next to Alpha ebb and flow, our lives are distinguished by ups and downs as well.  Nothing is permanent and be assured that just when life may seem too heavy to bear, there is hope that this moment will pass and eventually bring solace.

I have provided links to the NAMI Online Support Groups, NAMI Coastal, as well as Covid-19 Resources.

https://www.namicoastalvirginia.org/online-support-groups

namicoastalvirginia.org

https://www.namicoastalvirginia.org/covid-19-resources

 

 

 

 

The Rev. John Rohrs, Mentally Healthy Norfolk Coalition

Reflections on Cafe Bauer, Berlin by Edvard Munch

In this striking exhibit, most of the subjects depicted in the prints are solitary, and many are in evident anguish.  In contrast, this cafe scene seems ordinary and light-hearted by comparison.  And yet a closer look at the faces in the print reveals nary a smile.  They don’t even seem to be engaging with one another; heads are down, brows are furrowed, and each set of eyes looks past the other.  I wonder if this perspective reflects Munch’s own struggle to relate with others and build community; or, perhaps, it is a window into the isolation he saw in the world around him, even in places and people who would seem to be drawn together at first glance.

To me, this print has much to say to our present moment.  How often do we share a coffee or a meal with others at a cafe, only to look around and find everyone looking at their own phones?  How often do we hide our own feelings of distress and isolation in public, putting on masks and pretending that all is well?  Good mental health requires us to engage authentically with one another, to be willing to share our hurts and hopes, to look others in the eye and talk about our struggles.  Perhaps one hard-earned grace that will emerge after this deadly coronavirus pandemic is that we all will be more ready to acknowledge our vulnerability.  None of us is spared from the anxiety and fear of this moment, and we are finding solidarity and community in the midst of that realization.  I pray that we might translate that solidarity into action on many fronts in the months ahead, including a commitment to reducing stigma and increasing access to mental health care in our city, state, and country.

The Mentally Healthy Coalition is a group of health professionals, educators, city officials, nonprofit leaders, and others.  The coronavirus pandemic has postponed plans for our launch of Talk About It Norfolk, a campaign designed to help people access mental health care when and where they need it.  Please visit our website to learn more – talkaboutitnorfolk.com – and stay tuned for a rescheduled launch in the months ahead.

 

 

 

Edvard Munch (Norwegian, 1863–1944)
Café Bauer, Berlin, 1902
Drypoint
National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection, 1944
From the Collection