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Moses Myers House

323 E. Freemason St.
Open Saturday and Sunday

Noon–5 p.m.

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Reading Room
Currently closed

About the Myers House

The oldest Jewish home in America open to the public as a museum offers a glimpse of the life of an early 19th century merchant family.
More about the house

About the Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Art Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

Located in Norfolk

One Memorial Place,
Norfolk, VA
Get Directions

While You're Here

Visit our Museum Shop
and the Wisteria Cafe.

Perry Glass Studio

A state-of-art facility on the Museum’s campus. See a free glassmaking demo Tuesdays–Sunday at noon. Like what you see? Take a class with us! More about the Studio

Moses Myers House

The home of the first permanent Jewish residents of Norfolk, this historic house offers a glimpse of the life of a wealthy early 19th-century merchant family.
More about the house

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the Library

Wedding & Event Rentals

The perfect place for your big day or special event. Get the details

In-person Tours

Group tours are available for groups of 20 or fewer. More about tours

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Visit one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

About the Chrysler

Our story spans well over 100 years. See where we began, how we grew, and where we're going. Explore our history

News and Announcements

See what's happening at the Museum, read Chrysler Magazine, and find our Media Center. Read now

Location

745 Duke Street
Norfolk, VA 23510
757-333-6299

Always Free Parking

Get Directions

Third Thursdays

Live art performances monthly.
See the archive

Studio Team

Meet the brilliant minds behind the Studio.
See the team

Visiting Artist Series

Bringing the world’s top glass art talent to Hampton Roads
Find out more

Give the Chrysler Experience

Share everything you love about the Chrysler Museum with a gift membership. Perfect for everyone on your list.

The Masterpiece Society

Learn about this innovative group of museum supporters.
Meet the Masterpiece Society

Planned Giving

Help ensure the long-term success of the Museum.
Learn about planned giving

Moses Myers House

323 E. Freemason St.
Open Saturday and Sunday

Noon–5 p.m.

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Reading Room
Currently closed

About the Myers House

The oldest Jewish home in America open to the public as a museum offers a glimpse of the life of an early 19th century merchant family.
More about the house

About the Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Art Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

Located in Norfolk

One Memorial Place,
Norfolk, VA
Get Directions

While You're Here

Visit our Museum Shop
and the Wisteria Cafe.

Perry Glass Studio

A state-of-art facility on the Museum’s campus. See a free glassmaking demo Tuesdays–Sunday at noon. Like what you see? Take a class with us! More about the Studio

Moses Myers House

The home of the first permanent Jewish residents of Norfolk, this historic house offers a glimpse of the life of a wealthy early 19th-century merchant family.
More about the house

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the Library

Wedding & Event Rentals

The perfect place for your big day or special event. Get the details

In-person Tours

Group tours are available for groups of 20 or fewer. More about tours

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Visit one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

About the Chrysler

Our story spans well over 100 years. See where we began, how we grew, and where we're going. Explore our history

News and Announcements

See what's happening at the Museum, read Chrysler Magazine, and find our Media Center. Read now

Location

745 Duke Street
Norfolk, VA 23510
757-333-6299

Always Free Parking

Get Directions

Third Thursdays

Live art performances monthly.
See the archive

Studio Team

Meet the brilliant minds behind the Studio.
See the team

Visiting Artist Series

Bringing the world’s top glass art talent to Hampton Roads
Find out more

Give the Chrysler Experience

Share everything you love about the Chrysler Museum with a gift membership. Perfect for everyone on your list.

The Masterpiece Society

Learn about this innovative group of museum supporters.
Meet the Masterpiece Society

Planned Giving

Help ensure the long-term success of the Museum.
Learn about planned giving

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Glass Studio

Classes and Workshops

The Perry Glass Studio offers something for everyone, from beginners to professional artists. Experience the excitement of glassmaking for yourself!

Glass Studio FAQs
#ChryslerfromHome

Take-Home Fusing Projects Learn more

three colored glass pumpkins
Beginner

Learn the basics in these entry level classes. View all

brown vase and set of tall cups
Intermediate

Take your experience to the next level. See class offerings

Glass Tumbler with Blue Cane
Advanced

Due to enhanced health and safety protocols these classes are not currently offered. Please check back in the new year.

Benjamin Moore, Dante Marioni, Janusz Pozniak
Open Studio

Advance your knowledge during these evening sessions. View sessions

Private Lessons

Saturdays from 5:30–8:30 p.m. Other times may be available as scheduling permits. For more information or to reserve your evening, please call the Glass Studio at 757-333-6299.

Individual Training

Invest three hours in concentrated one-on-one training with a skilled instructor.

Glass color frit
Group Sessions

Many of our regular classes can be scheduled as private sessions for your group. Prices vary by process and group size.

Glass Processes

Below are detailed descriptions of the glass processes offered at the Perry Glass Studio. See examples of works representing each of these processes from the Chrysler Museum collection.

Coldworking

Coldworking is the practice of cutting, grinding, polishing, and engraving glass at room temperature to carve, shape, and add surface decoration. Textures and designs are applied with techniques dating back to Ancient Egypt. Using abrasives such as diamonds, stone, silicone carbide, and cerium, cold-workers achieve finishes ranging from rough to optically polished. “Cameo” and “cut glass” are two prominent coldworking techniques. Rooted in emulating the practice of gem cutting and faceting, coldworking is now achieved with modern tools such as belt sanders, lapidary wheels, lathes, saws, sandblasters, handheld grinders/engravers, and drill presses. George Woodall and Thomas Woodall, The Intruders and The Attack

Glassblowing

Glassblowing is the act of inflating a molten glass bubble on the end of a blowpipe (a long, steel tube) and manipulating it with a variety of metal and wooden tools. The fluid bubble is also shaped using invisible tools such as gravity, air pressure, centrifugal force, and heat. To get started, raw materials are heated in a furnace to 2150º F. In its molten state, glass is the consistency of thick honey and is constantly moving until its temperature drops below 1300º F. The glassblower must respond to its flow, moving with it in a dance that dates back to 50 BCE. In the hot glass studio, also known as a hot shop, there are typically furnaces for melting glass; reheating chambers to keep the glass in a molten state during the artist’s creative process; and ovens/kilns to slowly cool the glass to room temperature, relieving any internal stress. Nancy Callan, Aquaman Stinger

Glass Sculpting

Glass sculpting is similar to glassblowing, but there is no breath or bubble involved. This technique calls upon artists to manipulate solid molten glass on the end of a long metal rod. A variety of metal and wooden tools are used to sculpt the glass in its molten state. As in glassblowing, the glass comes from a melting furnace and is worked in the hot shop before being placed in a kiln to cool slowly from 900º F to room temperature. John Miller, CB w/ L, T and pickles

Fusing and Slumping

Fusing begins in the flat glass studio. The artist creates a design with paper and pencil and transfers the design to sheet glass. These sheets may be clear, colorful, transparent, or opaque. The flat glass is cut into shapes with scoring tools called glass cutters. The cut shapes fit together like a puzzle, and the tightly fitting pieces are stacked on top of each other into two or more layers. The assembled “puzzle” goes into a kiln where it is slowly heated to a temperature between 1200º F and 1500º F, achieving the desired level of “fuse.”

Slumping is commonly paired with fusing. Artists heat glass in a kiln until it softens (1250º F) and then slump the molten material into or over a mold to create bowls, platters, trays, and more. A typical slumping mold is made of a ceramic material to which glass will not stick. Some slumping processes involve complicated molds to make sculpture and manipulating the glass “by hand” inside the kiln when it is at slumping temperature.
Jun Kaneko, Colorbox II

Flameworking

One of the oldest glassmaking techniques, flameworking has maintained its relevance from ancient times to today. Ancient Egyptians developed it to create beads and small vessels. Today, it is an artist process and one used to create scientific laboratory ware and intricate medical devices. The crucial tool in flameworking is the torch. Modern torches are fueled with propane and oxygen. Before modern advancements, artists used an oil lamp with air added from a bellows, which is why it is also referred to as lampworking. Ancient “torches” were ceramic beehive-shaped fire boxes with a small opening in the top, which allowed a focused flame to escape.

Solid glass rods and hollow glass tubing are heated directly in a torch’s flame and then shaped/inflated. Sculpture, vessels, and jewelry are common items made using this process. There is a wide range of possibility from producing very small and intricate works to much larger and grand, depending on the size of the torch and the scale of the glass material (tubing). Gravity, centrifugal force, air pressure, and heat all play a major role in shaping glass at the torch.
Giani Tosso, Chess Set (Rook)

Stained Glass

Artists create stained, or leaded, glass by assembling glass components with solder or lead. The process is most commonly associated with colorful windows in churches. Some of the oldest stained glass dates back to the first century CE.

Artists begin the process by drawing a design or “cartoon” on paper. In the drawing, they delineate where specific colors and shapes will appear in the final product. The artists use a scoring tool to cut each piece of the design from sheet glass, which may be smooth or textured and colorful or clear. In the copper foil technique, most commonly used today, the edges of each piece of flat glass are wrapped with a thin strip of copper foil. Once all the components are prepared, flux is applied to ensure good adhesion and the soldering process begins. One by one, each connecting seam between shapes is slowly joined together using an electric iron and a spool of solder. Upon completion, a patina is often applied to the solder joints to achieve the desired look. This technique can be used to create flat windows and window hangings and three-dimensional forms such as light shades.
Tiffany Studio, Woman in a Pergola with Wisteria

From the Collection