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Historic Houses

Located on Freemason St. —
Open Saturday and Sunday

Noon to 5 p.m.

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Barry Arts Building at 4600 Monarch Way —
Tuesday-Thursday

10:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Moses Myers House

The oldest Jewish home in America open to the public as a museum offers a glimpse of the life of an early 19th century merchant family.
More about the house

About the Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Art Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

Willoughby-Baylor House

Completed in 1794, this former home now presents a mix of art and artifacts. See what's on view

Located in Norfolk

One Memorial Place,
Norfolk, VA
Get Directions

While You're Here

Visit our Museum Shop
and the Wisteria Cafe.

Moses Myers House

The oldest Jewish home in America open to the public as a museum, offers a glimpse of the life of an early 19th century merchant family.
More about the house

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

Willoughby-Baylor House

Completed in 1794, this building was the long-time home of the Norfolk History Museum. No we present a mix of art and artifacts. More about the house

Weddings & Event Rentals

The perfect place for your big day or special event. Get the details

Take a tour

We offer a number of tours on different topics. More about tours

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Visit one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

About the Chrysler

Our story spans well over 100 years. See where we began, how we grew, and where we're going. Explore our history

News and Announcements

See what's happening at the Museum, read Chrysler Magazine, and find our Media Center. Read now

Location

745 Duke Street
Norfolk, VA 23510
757-333-6299

Always Free Parking

Get Directions

Third Thursdays

Live art performances monthly.
See the archive

Studio Team

Meet the brilliant minds behind the Studio.
See the team

Vestibule 102

Work from local artists and studio assistants.
See what's on view now

The Masterpiece Society

Learn about this innovative group of museum supporters.
Meet the Masterpiece Society

Planned Giving

Help ensure the long-term success of the Museum.
Learn about planned giving

Historic Houses

Located on Freemason St. —
Open Saturday and Sunday

Noon to 5 p.m.

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Barry Arts Building at 4600 Monarch Way —
Tuesday-Thursday

10:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Moses Myers House

The oldest Jewish home in America open to the public as a museum offers a glimpse of the life of an early 19th century merchant family.
More about the house

About the Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Art Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

Willoughby-Baylor House

Completed in 1794, this former home now presents a mix of art and artifacts. See what's on view

Located in Norfolk

One Memorial Place,
Norfolk, VA
Get Directions

While You're Here

Visit our Museum Shop
and the Wisteria Cafe.

Moses Myers House

The oldest Jewish home in America open to the public as a museum, offers a glimpse of the life of an early 19th century merchant family.
More about the house

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

With an extensive collection of more than 106,000 rare and unique volumes relating to the history of art, the Jean Outland Chrysler Library is one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

Willoughby-Baylor House

Completed in 1794, this building was the long-time home of the Norfolk History Museum. No we present a mix of art and artifacts. More about the house

Weddings & Event Rentals

The perfect place for your big day or special event. Get the details

Take a tour

We offer a number of tours on different topics. More about tours

Jean Outland Chrysler Library

Visit one of the most significant art libraries in the South. More about the library

About the Chrysler

Our story spans well over 100 years. See where we began, how we grew, and where we're going. Explore our history

News and Announcements

See what's happening at the Museum, read Chrysler Magazine, and find our Media Center. Read now

Location

745 Duke Street
Norfolk, VA 23510
757-333-6299

Always Free Parking

Get Directions

Third Thursdays

Live art performances monthly.
See the archive

Studio Team

Meet the brilliant minds behind the Studio.
See the team

Vestibule 102

Work from local artists and studio assistants.
See what's on view now

The Masterpiece Society

Learn about this innovative group of museum supporters.
Meet the Masterpiece Society

Planned Giving

Help ensure the long-term success of the Museum.
Learn about planned giving

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ArtExhibitionsPast

Public and Private

On View

November 17, 2016 — March 26, 2017

Located in

Past Exhibition

Peer behind the Iron Curtain to see how creativity resists conformity. Ulrich Wust’s photos capture the de-personalization of urban life in cities beset by standardized prefab housing blocks and looming Soviet monuments.

At the same time, he reveals the creative interior lives of those living under the German Democratic Republic. Images of house parties, nightclubs, and shop windows suggest the struggle for self-expression and individuality amid the totalitarian states regime of sameness. In Wust’s first U.S. retrospective, the gritty immediacy of 35mm black-and-white street photography gives way to poetic reverie.

Ulrich Wust Headshot
Ulrich Wust
Ulrich Wust, Palast der Republik
Ulrich Wust, Palast der Republik, Berlin, silver gelatin print, 1985. From Notizen (Notes).

Wust, born in 1949, was trained as a city planner and his education is evident in the composition of these photographs. Just as important is the subtle psychology involved. For decades he and his fellow citizens lived a life that, according to official dictates, did not exist. As Mark Feeney put it in a review in the Boston Globe:

It’s a tribute to the subtlety of Wust’s artistry that the authorities banned his work just once, a series called “Die Pracht der Macht (The Pomp of Power),” a deadpan documenting of monumental architecture. “If I had always focused on presenting my work in public, I would have had to stop working,” Wust has written. “My approach was to work for myself first.” The result isn’t so much art for art’s sake as art for truth’s sake.

This exhibition is organized by MIT Museum at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, in collaboration with the photographer and Loock Galerie, Berlin. It will be on view in the Frank Photography Galleries (G. 228) and the Focus Gallery (G. 229) from Nov. 17, 2016, to April 23, 2017. Admission is free.

Ulrich Wust, Weimar
Ulrich Wust, Weimar, 1989, silver gelatin print, 1989. From Jahrebuch (Yearbook).
More special exhibitions

On view right now

Chaos and Awe Exhibition
Through April 28, 2019

Chaos and Awe:
Painting for the 21st Century
Exhibition Details

Ezra Wube Kaled
Through December 30, 2018

Ezra Wube: Tales of Home
Exhibition Details

From the Collection